Traditional Asian Medicine Meridians: The Primo-Vascular System (PVS)

Traditional Asian Medicine Meridians: The Primo-Vascular System (PVS)

Febuary 27, 2020

Traditional Asian Medicine Meridians: The Primo-Vascular System (PVS)

The first documentation that clearly describes the meridians was the Huangdi Neijing (given the title The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine in one of the latest translations), dating from about 100 BCE. This description has been traditionally accepted and used as a basis for acupuncture theory and practice for over 2000 years. Since the early 1950s, researchers have tried to prove the physical existence of these meridians. Much of acupuncture’s scientific skepticism is partly due to the unknown anatomical foundation for the existence of meridians. The Standard International Acupuncture Nomenclature proposed by the World Health Organization, and based on TCM texts, describe 12 organ meridians and eight extrameridians – 20 meridians in all. The anatomic structure of meridians has remained undiscovered till the 1960s.

 

Bong-Han Kim, a professor at the Pyongyang Medical School in Seoul, North Korea, embarked on scientific research to discover the substratum of the meridian system (Kyungrak in Korean). While head of the Department of Physiology, Kim announced his discovery of this anatomical substratum, calling it the “Substance of Kyungrak,” on August 18, 1961, which he then published in 1962. Kim then proposed a system he called the Bonghan Ducts as the physical basis for the Traditional Chinese meridian system. Kim subsequently published 6 articles and a book on his research from 1962 to 1965. 1-7

 

Kim described nodes and ducts that corresponded to traditional acupuncture points and meridians. He called these nodes and ducts Bonghan corpuscles and Bonghan ducts after his own name. In the 1962 publication, he wrote that the substrate of the meridian system “consists of bundles of tubular structures and it is clearly distinguishable from nervous, blood vessels and lymph systems in histological and experimental-biological characters” and ”the diameter of the tubular structures range between 20 and 50 µm.”

 

Kim used several experimental methods in determining this such as anatomical methods, histological methods, radioautography, histochemical methods, blue staining methods, and radioactive dosimetry. In his analyses of the Bong-Han system Kim found that the transparent fluid inside the ducts contains more nucleic acids, especially DNA, than any other known tissue. The Bong-Han ducts also contain sanals, meaning “live egg” in Korean, which seem to have a function equivalent to that of stem cells. Kim described these sanals, renamed primo microcell or P-microcell, as having hematopoietic functions as well as the ability to regenerate injured tissues and heal wounds.

 

Bong-Han Kim’s work was largely ignored until in 2002 at the Seoul National University a team of researchers led by Professor Kwang-Sup Soh investigated further and conclusively confirmed that this system represented the physical construct of the acupuncture system.8, 9, 10, 11 They renamed it the Primo Vascular System (PVS) and have shown it exists in the same locations as the traditional meridian system acting as a third circulatory system after the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. Numerous others since have further described these Primo vessels as having bioelectrical activity, excitatory conductivity, and mechanical motility.12, 13, 14, 15, 16 Over several investigations have discovered these primo-vessels (Bonghan ducts) and primo-nodes (Bonghan corpuscles) in various animal tissues and organs – mouse, rat, and rabbits.

 

According to this research the PVS integrates the features of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and hormonal systems. It provides a physical substrate for the acupuncture points and meridians. Announcements of the morphological architectonics and the function of the PVS fundamentally changed the basic understanding of biology and medicine because the PVS is also involved in the development and the functions of living organisms.

 

Korean researchers discovered a liquid, called “the primo fluid”, that circulates in the PVS. Its flow is slower than blood flow and lymphatic flow. The primo fluid flows in one direction, attending blood flow. The liquid flow depends on the heartbeat and on the pressures of the blood and the lymph. The PVS fluid has DNA outside the cell nucleus. The biochemical components of primo fluids are DNA, RNA, nitrogen, fats, reducing sugar, hyaluronic acid, 19 free amino acids, and 16 free mononucleotides. The routes of flow are interconnected, but relatively independent. Primo fluid circulates only in a specified region, but it can also be transmitted through interconnections with other pathways.

 

The subvessels of the PVs are composed of endothelial cells with rod-shaped nuclei, smooth muscle cells, and adventitia. Fiber structures and amorphous substances exist among the subvessels. A membrane surrounds the whole primo vessel. The constituents of the PN are the subvessels and various cells. The subvessels are densely distributed, enlarged, and connected to each other. Kim developed his idea for the PVS by adding interior and exterior PVs.

 

As previously mentioned, the PVs have bioelectrical activity, excitatory conductivity, and mechanical motility. The electrical activity changes in relation to stimuli to the PVs. The PVs have mechanisms to circulate the primo fluid actively. All nuclei of the tissue cells are connected to fine terminal subvessels, and these subvessels are connected to the primo vessels in a body’s organs. The PNs in an organ are connected to the organ’s tissue cells within a specified range. All PNs for the organs are connected to all meridians. The meridian structures start and end at the PNs for the organs.

 

It has taken over 2000 years to validate the meridian system originally described in the Huangdi Neijing. Kim and Soh’s research toward the meridian system has now fostered many others to further explore the PVS. The discovery of the PVS in intravascular and extravascular spaces, in the central and peripheral nervous systems, on the surface of and within viscera, in cutaneous layers, and in most body systems, may signify a novel and complete morpho-dynamic system, with the potential to reshape paradigms in medicine and especially energy medicine.

 

This video explains the PVS using a staining dye injected into the body. In their video example, they chose to look at a section of PVS inside of a Lymph vessel because the normally transparent tissue will clearly elucidate with the dye. The width of these tubes is 20-30 micrometers; contrast that with the thickness of human hair 60-120 micrometers.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPQZXfPj7TI&feature=youtu.be

 

Thornton Streeter, a biofield scientist created an excellent presentation on the PVS and its relations to both TCM and the Nadis of the Yogic/Ayurvedic traditions.

 

https://www.slideshare.net/thorntonstreeter/primo-vascularmeridian-system-2016

 

Other noteworthy discoveries:

 

Recent research at a joint Harvard-MIT Biomedical imaging center used fMRI to see changes in the brain as a result of needling acupoints on various meridians in the body. (Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow.) Incredibly, they were able to show deactivation of the limbic brain and amygdala through needling the acupoints Large Intestine 4, Liver 3 and Stomach 36.

 

http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/acupuncture/PPG/projects/index.php

 

Further Chinese research has confirmed their findings.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18684074

References:

 

1. Kim BH. Great Discovery in Biology and Medicine: Substance of Kyungrak. Pyongyang,

North Korea: Foreign Languages Publishing House; 1962.

2. Kim BH. Study on the reality of acupuncture meridians [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1962; 9: 5-

13.

3. Kim BH. On the Kyungrak system. J Acad Med Sci DPR Korea. 1963; 90: 1-41.

4. Kim BH. On the Kyungrak System. Pyongyang, North Korea: DPR Korea; 1964.

5. Kim BH. The Kyungrak system [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1965; 108: 1-38.

6. Kim BH. The sanal theory. J Acad Med Sci DPR Korea. 1965; 108: 39-62.

7. Kim BH. Sanals and hematopoiesis [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1965: 1-6.

8. Soh KS, Hong S, Hong JY, Lee BC, Yoo JS. Immunohistochemical characterization of

intravascular Bonghan duct. Microcirculation. 2006; 13: 166.

9. Soh, Kwang-Sup. “Bonghan circulatory system as an extension of acupuncture

meridians.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 2, no. 2 (2009): 93-106.

10. Soh, Kwang-Sup, Kyung A. Kang, and David K. Harrison, eds. The Primo Vascular System: Its

Role in Cancer and Regeneration. Springer Science & Business Media, 2011.

11. Soh, Kwang-Sup. “Current state of research on the primo vascular system.” In The Primo

Vascular System, pp. 25-39. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

12. Stefanov, Miroslav, Michael Potroz, Jungdae Kim, Jake Lim, Richard Cha, and Min-Ho

Nam. “The primo vascular system as a new anatomical system.” Journal of acupuncture and

meridian studies 6, no. 6 (2013): 331-338.

13. Stefanov, Miroslav, and Jungdae Kim. “Primo vascular system as a new morphofunctional

integrated system.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 5, no. 5 (2012): 193-200.

14. Ghiron, Chiara. “The Primo Vascular System as a Possible Exosomal Route Across the

Body: Implications for Tumor Proliferation and Metastasis.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian

studies 12, no. 1 (2019): 25-28.

15. Chikly, Bruno, Paul Roberts, and Jorgen Quaghebeur. “Primo vascular system: a unique

biological system shifting a medical paradigm.” J Am Osteopath Assoc 116, no. 1 (2016): 12-21.

The following are selected articles on the primo-vascular system (PVS) and Bonghan

corpuscles and ducts.

PVS and Bonghan Research Articles

 

An, Ping, Jingxing Dai, Zhendong Su, Jung-Sun Yoo, Rongmei Qu, Sung-Woo Lee, Ki-Hoon Eom,

Kyang-Hee Bae, Hesheng Luo, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Putative primo-vascular system in mesentery

of rats.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 3, no. 4 (2010): 232-240.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290110600428

 

Chikly, Bruno, Paul Roberts, and Jorgen Quaghebeur. “Primo vascular system: a unique biological

system shifting a medical paradigm.” J Am Osteopath Assoc 116, no. 1 (2016): 12-21.

 

https://www.cecity.com/aoa/jaoa_mag/2016/jan_16/12.pdf

 

Cho, Seong-Jin, Sang-Hun Lee, Wenji Zhang, Sae-Bhom Lee, Kwang-Ho Choi, Sun-Mi Choi, and

Yeon-Hee Ryu. “Mathematical distinction in action potential between primo-vessels and smooth

muscle.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2012 (2012).

 

http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2012/269397.pdf

 

Choi, Jae-Hong, Tae Hee Han, Chae Jeong Lim, So Yeong Lee, and Pan Dong Ryu. “Basic

electrophysiological properties of cells in the organ surface primo vascular tissues of Rats.” In The

Primo Vascular System, pp. 243-249. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pan_Dong_Ryu/publication/302466169_Basic_Electrophysi

ological_Properties_of_Cells_in_the_Organ_Surface_Primo_Vascular_Tissues_of_Rats/links/5d88

1c29a6fdcc8fd6106ac0/Basic-Electrophysiological-Properties-of-Cells-in-the-Organ-Surface-PrimoVascular-Tissues-of-Rats.pdf

 
 

Choi, Jae-Hong, Chae Jeong Lim, Tae Hee Han, Seul Ki Lee, So Yeong Lee, and Pan Dong Ryu.

“TEA-sensitive currents contribute to membrane potential of organ surface primo-node cells in

rats.” The Journal of membrane biology 239, no. 3 (2011): 167-175.

 

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00232-010-9335-5

 

Fujiwara, S., and S. B. Yu. “Bonghan theory’morphological studies.” Igaku no Ayumi 60, no. 11

(1967): 567-577.

 

Ghiron, Chiara. “The Primo Vascular System as a Possible Exosomal Route Across the Body:

Implications for Tumor Proliferation and Metastasis.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 12, no.1 (2019): 25-28.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S200529011830075X

 

Islam, Md Ashraful, Shelia D. Thomas, Kara J. Sedoris, Stephen P. Slone, Houda Alatassi, and

Donald M. Miller. “Tumor-associated primo vascular system is derived from xenograft, not

host.” Experimental and Molecular Pathology 94, no. 1 (2013): 84-90.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0014480012001268

 

Jia, Zhao-Feng, Kwang-Sup Soh, Qiang Zhou, Bo Dong, and Wen-Hui Yu. “Study of novel

threadlike structures on the intestinal fascia of dogs.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 4, no.2 (2011): 98-101.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290111600149

 

Jia, Zhaofeng, Kwang-Sup Soh, Qiang Zhou, Bo Dong, and Wenhui Yu. “Observation of the primo

vascular system on the fascia of dogs.” In The Primo Vascular System, pp. 71-75. Springer, New York,

NY, 2012.

 

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4614-0601-3_10

 

Jiang, Xiaowen, Hee-Kyeong Kim, Hak-Soo Shin, Byong-chon Lee, Chunho Choi, Kyung-Soon

Soh, Byeung-Soo Cheun, Ku-youn Baik, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Method for observing intravascular

Bonghan duct.” arXiv preprint physics/0211086 (2002).

 

https://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0211086.pdf

 

Johng, Hyeon-Min, Jung Sun Yoo, Tae-Jong Yoon, Hak-Soo Shin, Byung-Cheon Lee, Changhoon

Lee, Jin-Kyu Lee, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Use of magnetic nanoparticles to visualize threadlike

structures inside lymphatic vessels of rats.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 4, no.1 (2007): 77-82.

 

http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2007/413838.pdf

Jung, Sharon Jiyoon, Sang Yeon Cho, Kyoung-Hee Bae, Sun Hee Hwang, Byung-Cheon Lee,

Sungchul Kim, Byoung Se Kwon, Hee Min Kwon, Yoon-Kyu Song, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Protocol

for the observation of the primo vascular system in the lymph vessels of rabbits.” Journal of

Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 5, no. 5 (2012): 234-240.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290112001100

 

Kim BH. Great Discovery in Biology and Medicine: Substance of Kyungrak. Pyongyang, North Korea:

Foreign Languages Publishing House; 1962.

Kim BH. Study on the reality of acupuncture meridians [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1962; 9: 5-13.

Kim BH. On the Kyungrak system. J Acad Med Sci DPR Korea. 1963; 90: 1-41.

Kim BH. On the Kyungrak System. Pyongyang, North Korea: DPR Korea; 1964.

Kim BH. The Kyungrak system [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1965; 108: 1-38.

Kim BH. The sanal theory. J Acad Med Sci DPR Korea. 1965; 108: 39-62.

Kim BH. Sanals and hematopoiesis [in Korean]. J Jo Sun Med. 1965: 1-6.

Kim, Jungdae, Vyacheslav Ogay, Byung-Cheon Lee, Min-Su Kim, Inbin Lim, Hee-Jong Woo, HiJoon Park, Jan Kehr, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Catecholamine-producing novel endocrine organ:

Bonghan system.” Medical Acupuncture 20, no. 2 (2008): 97-102.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jan_Kehr/publication/244890795_CatecholamineProducing_Novel_Endocrine_Organ_Bonghan_System/links/5a97981a0f7e9ba42974ddd4/Catech

olamine-Producing-Novel-Endocrine-Organ-Bonghan-System.pdf

Kim, Jungdae, Jonghyun Jung, and Michael Potroz. “Summary of Bong-Han Kim’s publications.”

In The Primo Vascular System, pp. 7-17. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4614-0601-3_2

Kim, Min-Su, Ju-Young Hong, Su Hong, Byung-Cheon Lee, Chang-Hoon Nam, Hee-Jong Woo,

Dae-In Kang, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Bong-Han corpuscles as possible stem cell niches on the

organ-surfaces.” Journal of Pharmacopuncture 11, no. 1 (2008): 5-12.

http://www.koreascience.or.kr/article/JAKO200809234354578.page

Kim, Sungha, Sharon Jiyoon Jung, Sang Yeon Cho, Yoon Kyu Song, Kwang-Sup Soh, and Sungchul

Kim. “A Method for the Observation of the Primo Vascular System in the Thoracic Duct of a

Rat.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2013 (2013).

http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/536560.pdf

Kwon, Byoung S., Chang M. Ha, Sungsook Yu, Byung-Cheon Lee, Jae Y. Ro, and Sunhee Hwang.

“Microscopic nodes and ducts inside lymphatics and on the surface of internal organs are rich in

granulocytes and secretory granules.” Cytokine 60, no. 2 (2012): 587-592.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1043466612005984

Kwon, Joonhyung, Ku Youn Baik, Byung-Cheon Lee, Kwang-Sup Soh, Nam Joo Lee, and Chi Jung

Kang. “Scanning probe microscopy study of microcells from the organ surface Bonghan

corpuscle.” Applied Physics Letters 90, no. 17 (2007): 173903.

https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.2732183

Lee, Byung‐Cheon, Ku Youn Baik, Hyeon‐Min Johng, Tae Jeong Nam, Jawoong Lee, Baeckkyoung

Sung, Chunho Choi et al. “Acridine orange staining method to reveal the characteristic features of an

intravascular threadlike structure.” The Anatomical Record Part B: The New Anatomist: An Official

Publication of the American Association of Anatomists 278, no. 1 (2004): 27-30.

https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ar.b.20018

Lee, Byung‐Cheon, Jung Sun Yoo, Ku Youn Baik, Ki Woo Kim, and Kwang‐Sup Soh. “Novel

threadlike structures (Bonghan ducts) inside lymphatic vessels of rabbits visualized with a Janus

Green B staining method.” The Anatomical Record Part B: The New Anatomist: An Official Publication of

the American Association of Anatomists 286, no. 1 (2005): 1-7.

https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ar.b.20076

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Ku-Youn Baik, Hyeon-Min Johng, Baeck-Kyoung Sung, Kyung-Soon Soh, DaeIn Kang, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Fluorescent method for observing intravascular Bonghan

duct.” Journal of Pharmacopuncture 8, no. 3 (2005): 5-9.

http://ocean.kisti.re.kr/downfile/volume/kpi/DHOCBS/2005/v8n3/DHOCBS_2005_v8n3_5.pd

f

Lee, Byung‐Cheon, Jung Sun Yoo, Vyacheslav Ogay, Ki Woo Kim, Harald Dobberstein, Kwang‐

Sup Soh, and Byung‐Soo Chang. “Electron microscopic study of novel threadlike structures on the

surfaces of mammalian organs.” Microscopy Research and Technique 70, no. 1 (2007): 34-43.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jemt.20383

Lee, Byung-Cheon, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Contrast-enhancing optical method to observe a

Bonghan duct floating inside a lymph vessel of a rabbit.” Lymphology 41, no. 4 (2008): 178-185.

https://journals.uair.arizona.edu/index.php/lymph/article/view/17043

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Sungkwang Kim, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Novel anatomic structures in the brain

and spinal cord of rabbit that may belong to the Bonghan system of potential acupuncture

meridians.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 1, no. 1 (2008): 29-35.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600042

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Seong-Uk Jhang, Jae-Hong Choi, So-Yeong Lee, Pan-Dong Ryu, and KwangSup Soh. “DiI staining of fine branches of Bonghan ducts on surface of rat abdominal

organs.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 2, no. 4 (2009): 301-305.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600728

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Ki Woo Kim, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Visualizing the network of Bonghan ducts

in the omentum and peritoneum by using Trypan blue.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 2,

no. 1 (2009): 66-70.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600170

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Ki-Hoon Eom, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Primo-vessels and primo-nodes in rat

brain, spine and sciatic nerve.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 3, no. 2 (2010): 111-115.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290110600209

Lee, Byung-Cheon, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Visualization of acupuncture meridians in the hypodermis

of rat using trypan blue.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies 3, no. 1 (2010): 49-52.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290110600088

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Hong Bae Kim, Baeckkyoung Sung, Ki Woo Kim, Jamin Sohn, Boram Son,

Byung-Joon Chang, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Network of endocardial vessels.” Cardiology 118, no. 1

(2011): 1-7.

https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/323844

Lee, Byung-Cheon, Hong Bae Kim, Baeckkyoung Sung, Ki Woo Kim, Jamin Sohn, Boram Son,

Byung-Joon Chang, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Structure of the sinus in the primo vessel inside the

bovine cardiac chambers.” In The Primo Vascular System, pp. 57-62. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Baeckkyoung_Sung/publication/226046695_Structure_of_th

e_Sinus_in_the_Primo_Vessel_Inside_the_Bovine_Cardiac_Chambers/links/0c96052e08a80763a7

000000/Structure-of-the-Sinus-in-the-Primo-Vessel-Inside-the-Bovine-Cardiac-Chambers.pdf

Lee, Changhoon, Seung–Kwon Seol, Byung–Cheon Lee, Young–Kwon Hong, Jung–Ho Je, and

Kwang–Sup Soh. “Alcian blue staining method to visualize Bonghan threads inside large caliber

lymphatic vessels and X-ray microtomography to reveal their microchannels.” Lymphatic Research and

Biology 4, no. 4 (2006): 181-190.

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/lrb.2006.4402

Lee, Ho-Sung, Won-Hee Park, A-Reum Je, Hee-Seok Kweon, and Byung-Cheon Lee. “Evidence for

novel structures (primo vessels and primo nodes) floating in the venous sinuses of rat

brains.” Neuroscience Letters 522, no. 2 (2012): 98-102.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304394012007768

Lee, Soo Jae, Byung-Cheon Lee, Chang Hoon Nam, Won-Chul Lee, Seong-Uk Jhang, Hyung Soon

Park, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Proteomic analysis for tissues and liquid from Bonghan ducts on rabbit

intestinal surfaces.” Journal of Acupuncture and meridian studies 1, no. 2 (2008): 97-109.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600297

Lee, Seung-Yoon, Byung-Cheon Lee, Kwang-Sup Soh, and Gil-Ja Jhon. “Development of the

putative primo vascular system before the formation of vitelline vessels in chick embryos.” In The

Primo Vascular System, pp. 77-82. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

Lim, Jaekwan, Jong Hyun Jung, Sungwoo Lee, Zhendong Su, Zhou Qiang, Kwangsup Soh, JinMyung Cha, and Jin-Kyu Lee. “Estimating the density of fluorescent nanoparticles in the primo

vessels in the fourth ventricle and the spinal cord of a rat.” Journal of Biomedical Optics 16, no. 11

(2011): 116010.

https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/journals/Journal-of-Biomedical-Optics/volume-16/issue11/116010/Estimating-the-density-of-fluorescent-nanoparticles-in-the-primovessels/10.1117/1.3647595.full

Liu, Jun-Ling, Xiang-Hong Jing, Hong Shi, Shu-Ping Chen, Wei He, Wan-Zhu Bai, and Bing Zhu.

“Historical review about research on “Bonghan system” in China.” Evidence-Based Complementary and

Alternative Medicine 2013 (2013).

http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/636081.pdf

Nam, Min-Ho, Jaekwan Lim, Seung-Hoon Choi, Sungchul Kim, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “A primo

vascular system underneath the superior sagittal sinus in the brain of a rabbit.” Journal of acupuncture

and meridian studies 5, no. 5 (2012): 210-217.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290112001070

Noh, Young-Il, Minsuk Rho, Yeong-Min Yoo, Sharon Jiyoon Jung, and Sang-Suk Lee. “Isolation

and morphological features of primo vessels in rabbit lymph vessels.” Journal of Acupuncture and

Meridian Studies 5, no. 5 (2012): 201-205.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290112001057

Ogay, Vyacheslav, Min Su Kim, Hyo Jun Seok, Cheon Joo Choi, and Kwang-Sup Soh.

“Catecholamine-storing cells at acupuncture points of rabbits.” Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian

Studies 1, no. 2 (2008): 83-90.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600273

Ogay, Vyacheslav, Kyung Hee Bae, Ki Woo Kim, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Comparison of the

characteristic features of Bonghan ducts, blood and lymphatic capillaries.” Journal of Acupuncture and

Meridian Studies 2, no. 2 (2009): 107-117.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S200529010960042X

Ogay, Vyacheslav, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Identification and characterization of small stem-like cells

in the primo vascular system of adult animals.” In The primo vascular system, pp. 149-155. Springer,

New York, NY, 2012.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4614-0601-3_21

Park, Sang-Hyun, Byung-Cheon Lee, Cheon-Joo Choi, Kwang-Sup Soh, Jae-Hong Choi, Soyeong

Lee, and Pandong Ryu. “Bioelectrical study of bonghan corpuscles on organ surfaces in rats.” Journal

of Korean Physical Society 55 (2009): 688.

Shin, Hak‐Soo, Hyeon‐Min Johng, Byung‐Cheon Lee, Sung‐Il Cho, Kyung‐Soon Soh, Ku‐Youn

Baik, Jung‐Sun Yoo, and Kwang‐Sup Soh. “Feulgen reaction study of novel threadlike structures

(Bonghan ducts) on the surfaces of mammalian organs.” The Anatomical Record Part B: The New

Anatomist: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists 284, no. 1 (2005): 35-40.

https://anatomypubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ar.b.20061

Shin, H. S., and K. S. Soh. “Electrical method to detect a Bonghan duct inside blood vessels.” New

Phys 45 (2002): 376-378.

Soh, Kwang-Sup. “Current state of research on the primo vascular system.” In The Primo Vascular

System, pp. 25-39. Springer, New York, NY, 2012.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4614-0601-3_5

Soh, K. S., S. Hong, J. Y. Hong, B. C. Lee, and J. S. Yoo. “Immunohistochemical characterization of

intravascular Bonghan duct.” Microcirculation 13 (2006): 166.

Soh, Kwang-Sup. “Bonghan circulatory system as an extension of acupuncture meridians.” Journal of

acupuncture and meridian studies 2, no. 2 (2009): 93-106.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290109600418

Soh, Kwang-Sup, Kyung A. Kang, and David K. Harrison, eds. The Primo Vascular System: Its Role in

Cancer and Regeneration. Springer Science & Business Media, 2011.

https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=H2vzeIkgjcC&oi=fnd&pg=PR3&dq=10.%09Soh,+KwangSup,+Kyung+A.+Kang,+and+David+K.+Harrison,+eds.+The+Primo+Vascular+System:+Its+R

ole+in+Cancer+and+Regeneration.+Springer+Science+%26+Business+Media,+2011.&ots=bcq0g

PaMUc&sig=p-ht3OP91dKzm7UQjJuWqOFAgpg#v=onepage&q=10.%09Soh%2C%20KwangSup%2C%20Kyung%20A.%20Kang%2C%20and%20David%20K.%20Harrison%2C%20eds.%20

The%20Primo%20Vascular%20System%3A%20Its%20Role%20in%20Cancer%20and%20Regener

ation.%20Springer%20Science%20%26%20Business%20Media%2C%202011.&f=false

Stefanov, Miroslav, and Jungdae Kim. “Primo vascular system as a new morphofunctional integrated

system.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 5, no. 5 (2012): 193-200.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290112001045

 

Stefanov, Miroslav, Michael Potroz, Jungdae Kim, Jake Lim, Richard Cha, and Min-Ho Nam. “The

primo vascular system as a new anatomical system.” Journal of acupuncture and meridian studies 6, no. 6(2013): 331-338.

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2005290113002082

 

Sung, Baeckkyoung, Min Su Kim, Byung-Cheon Lee, Jung Sun Yoo, Sang-Hee Lee, Youn-Joong

Kim, Ki-Woo Kim, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Measurement of flow speed in the channels of novel

threadlike structures on the surfaces of mammalian organs.” Naturwissenschaften 95, no. 2 (2008): 117-124.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Baeckkyoung_Sung/publication/6125747_Measurement_of_

flow_speed_in_the_channels_of_novel_threadlike_structures_on_the_surfaces_of_mammalian_org

ans/links/00b7d518f0b3b432e8000000.pdf

 

Yoo, Jung Sun, Min Su Kim, Vyacheslav Ogay, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “In vivo visualization of

Bonghan ducts inside blood vessels of mice by using an Alcian blue staining method.” (2008).

http://nopr.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/4468/1/IJEB%2046(5)%20336-

339.pdf?ev=pub_ext_prw_xdl

 

Yoo, Jung Sun, Hong Bae Kim, Nayoun Won, Jiwon Bang, Sungjee Kim, Saeyoung Ahn, ByungCheon Lee, and Kwang-Sup Soh. “Evidence for an additional metastatic route: in vivo imaging of

cancer cells in the primo-vascular system around tumors and organs.” Molecular Imaging and Biology 13, no. 3 (2011): 471-480.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/ByungCheon_Lee/publication/44692372_Evidence_for_an_Additional_Metastatic_Route_In_Vivo_Imaging_of_Cancer_Cells_in_the_PrimoVascular_System_Around_Tumors_and_Organs/links/0fcfd50fd6b45997ae000000.pdf

The first documentation that clearly describes the meridians was the Huangdi Neijing (given the title The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine in one of the latest translations), dating from about 100 BCE. This description has been traditionally accepted and used as a basis for acupuncture theory and practice for over 2000 years. Since the early 1950s, researchers have tried to prove the physical existence of these meridians. Much of acupuncture’s scientific skepticism is partly due to the unknown anatomical foundation for the existence of meridians. The Standard International Acupuncture Nomenclature proposed by the World Health Organization, and based on TCM texts, describe 12 organ meridians and eight extrameridians – 20 meridians in all. The anatomic structure of meridians has remained undiscovered till the 1960s.

 

Bong-Han Kim, a professor at the Pyongyang Medical School in Seoul, North Korea, embarked on scientific research to discover the substratum of the meridian system (Kyungrak in Korean). While head of the Department of Physiology, Kim announced his discovery of this anatomical substratum, calling it the “Substance of Kyungrak,” on August 18, 1961, which he then published in 1962. Kim then proposed a system he called the Bonghan Ducts as the physical basis for the Traditional Chinese meridian system. Kim subsequently published 6 articles and a book on his research from 1962 to 1965. 1-7

 

Kim described nodes and ducts that corresponded to traditional acupuncture points and meridians. He called these nodes and ducts Bonghan corpuscles and Bonghan ducts after his own name. In the 1962 publication, he wrote that the substrate of the meridian system “consists of bundles of tubular structures and it is clearly distinguishable from nervous, blood vessels and lymph systems in histological and experimental-biological characters” and ”the diameter of the tubular structures range between 20 and 50 µm.”

 

Kim used several experimental methods in determining this such as anatomical methods, histological methods, radioautography, histochemical methods, blue staining methods, and radioactive dosimetry. In his analyses of the Bong-Han system Kim found that the transparent fluid inside the ducts contains more nucleic acids, especially DNA, than any other known tissue. The Bong-Han ducts also contain sanals, meaning “live egg” in Korean, which seem to have a function equivalent to that of stem cells. Kim described these sanals, renamed primo microcell or P-microcell, as having hematopoietic functions as well as the ability to regenerate injured tissues and heal wounds.

 

Bong-Han Kim’s work was largely ignored until in 2002 at the Seoul National University a team of researchers led by Professor Kwang-Sup Soh investigated further and conclusively confirmed that this system represented the physical construct of the acupuncture system.8, 9, 10, 11 They renamed it the Primo Vascular System (PVS) and have shown it exists in the same locations as the traditional meridian system acting as a third circulatory system after the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. Numerous others since have further described these Primo vessels as having bioelectrical activity, excitatory conductivity, and mechanical motility.12, 13, 14, 15, 16 Over several investigations have discovered these primo-vessels (Bonghan ducts) and primo-nodes (Bonghan corpuscles) in various animal tissues and organs – mouse, rat, and rabbits.

 

According to this research the PVS integrates the features of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and hormonal systems. It provides a physical substrate for the acupuncture points and meridians. Announcements of the morphological architectonics and the function of the PVS fundamentally changed the basic understanding of biology and medicine because the PVS is also involved in the development and the functions of living organisms.

 

Korean researchers discovered a liquid, called “the primo fluid”, that circulates in the PVS. Its flow is slower than blood flow and lymphatic flow. The primo fluid flows in one direction, attending blood flow. The liquid flow depends on the heartbeat and on the pressures of the blood and the lymph. The PVS fluid has DNA outside the cell nucleus. The biochemical components of primo fluids are DNA, RNA, nitrogen, fats, reducing sugar, hyaluronic acid, 19 free amino acids, and 16 free mononucleotides. The routes of flow are interconnected, but relatively independent. Primo fluid circulates only in a specified region, but it can also be transmitted through interconnections with other pathways.

 

The subvessels of the PVs are composed of endothelial cells with rod-shaped nuclei, smooth muscle cells, and adventitia. Fiber structures and amorphous substances exist among the subvessels. A membrane surrounds the whole primo vessel. The constituents of the PN are the subvessels and various cells. The subvessels are densely distributed, enlarged, and connected to each other. Kim developed his idea for the PVS by adding interior and exterior PVs.

 

As previously mentioned, the PVs have bioelectrical activity, excitatory conductivity, and mechanical motility. The electrical activity changes in relation to stimuli to the PVs. The PVs have mechanisms to circulate the primo fluid actively. All nuclei of the tissue cells are connected to fine terminal subvessels, and these subvessels are connected to the primo vessels in a body’s organs. The PNs in an organ are connected to the organ’s tissue cells within a specified range. All PNs for the organs are connected to all meridians. The meridian structures start and end at the PNs for the organs.

 

It has taken over 2000 years to validate the meridian system originally described in the Huangdi Neijing. Kim and Soh’s research toward the meridian system has now fostered many others to further explore the PVS. The discovery of the PVS in intravascular and extravascular spaces, in the central and peripheral nervous systems, on the surface of and within viscera, in cutaneous layers, and in most body systems, may signify a novel and complete morpho-dynamic system, with the potential to reshape paradigms in medicine and especially energy medicine.

 

This video explains the PVS using a staining dye injected into the body. In their video example, they chose to look at a section of PVS inside of a Lymph vessel because the normally transparent tissue will clearly elucidate with the dye. The width of these tubes is 20-30 micrometers; contrast that with the thickness of human hair 60-120 micrometers.

 

 

Thornton Streeter, a biofield scientist created an excellent presentation on the PVS and its relations to both TCM and the Nadis of the Yogic/Ayurvedic traditions.

 

 

Other noteworthy discoveries:

 

Recent research at a joint Harvard-MIT Biomedical imaging center used fMRI to see changes in the brain as a result of needling acupoints on various meridians in the body. (Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow.) Incredibly, they were able to show deactivation of the limbic brain and amygdala through needling the acupoints Large Intestine 4, Liver 3 and Stomach 36.

 

http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/acupuncture/PPG/projects/index.php

 

Further Chinese research has confirmed their findings.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18684074

Recent Posts

Bioresonance Therapy

Bioresonance Therapy

February 7, 2020

Bioresonance Therapy

Marguerite Lane, ND

Acupuncture has benefited from the discovery of additional
meridians and points which were identified by Dr. Voll using electrodermal testing.

Overview

Ancient systems of healing refer to energy patterns, such as the aura and chakras described in Ayurvedic medicine, and the acupuncture meridians of Traditional and Classical Chinese medicine. Western medicine ignores what it cannot measure, and this has caused a hole in our understanding of health.

Our medical science considers the body to be a machine. There is an emphasis on finding the malfunctioning part (organ, tissue, biochemical pathway, etc.) and fixing or removing it. This philosophy works very well for acute illnesses or injuries. However, in this century, the greater health challenges concern chronic illnesses and degenerative diseases. We need to enhance our mechanical viewpoint to include the coordination which occurs as a result of the functioning of the various parts.

While medical science has focussed on smaller and smaller pieces of the physical puzzle, physics has moved in the opposite direction for the last 100 years, since the dawn of quantum physics. Physics recognises that there are invisible and immeasurable fields which surround us, influencing many aspects of our lives, including our health.

From the view of modern physics, the body is an extremely complex collection of standing waves created by the electromagnetic vibrations of the many cells, shapes and fluid movements, which reinforce and interfere with each other. If you think about it this way, you may realise that what is happening in the body is like music.

Bioresonance therapy employs concepts, remedies and techniques from acupuncture, resonance, and homeopathy. Let’s examine each of these using modern terminology, such as from the fields of physics and music, and then discuss bioresonance therapy.

Acupuncture

It has long been known in acupuncture that the body contains energy lines, or meridians, which must allow the free flow of energy for optimal health. In the last several decades, our scientists have repeatedly tried to locate the physical basis of the acupuncture system, using the basic assumption that anything “real” must be physically detectable.

Only when researchers have used energy detection technologies have they been able to locate the points and meridians. In 1947, Richard Croon, a Germany physician, found a correlation between skin resistance measurements and acupuncture points. Kirlian photography, based on high voltages and high frequencies, has allowed meridians to be clearly seen. Soft laser, microwaves, and acoustic waves have also been used to visualise the meridians.

According to Dr. Changlin Zhang, author of Invisible Rainbow – A physicist’s Introduction to the Science behind Classical Chinese Medicine:

…in light of the electromagnetic body, the acupuncture system can be understood as the prominent areas of an interference pattern formed by superposition of invisible electromagnetic standing waves.”

Resonance

All of the matter which makes up the universe is in vibration from the subatomic level upwards. In quantum physics, it is established that light and sound have both wave and material components; biological systems also have these characteristics. Modern biophysics has shown that DNA resonates with coherent vibrations. DNA has radio-like transmitting/receiving properties by which means biological systems can be influenced. It has repeatedly been proven that DNA can even be recreated by transmitting electromagnetic signals to pure water that had never had DNA in it.

Resonance is the matching of one wavelength of vibration to another. This can cause:

  • constructive interference, which amplifies the effect;
  • beat frequencies, an amplification based on the interaction of two or more waves that occasionally line up to produce constructive interference; and
  • destructive interference, which cancels the effect (in the way that noise-cancelling earphones work).

As such, resonance is a handy tool that we can use to affect the standing waves of the body.

Homeopathy

Homeopathy has confounded scientists ever since its inception around 1800 by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann. This is most likely due to another clash of chemical/material reductionist thinking versus physics/energy field and wave concepts. Western scientists have been stymied by the idea that a substance that is diluted into seeming oblivion could possibly have any discernible effect on the body. And yet, homeopathy is still popular because it does indeed work. The answer to homeopathy’s effect is in physics, not chemistry.

Scientists studying the characteristics of water, such as Gerald Pollack and Mae-Wan Ho have elucidated previously unknown structuring behaviour of water, called Coherent Domains (CDs), as proposed by Emilio Del Giudice and colleagues at Milan University.

The coherent domains (CDs) of water… trap EMFs inside and produce coherent oscillations… In fact, the CDs store externally supplied energy in the form of ‘coherent vortices’ [that] are long lasting because of coherence…

But how can the serial dilution and succession of a substance affect the water to make the remedy?

Dr. Ho’s description of the behaviour of coherent domains suggests the way in which homeopathic remedies are made and how they affect the body:

The CDs (coherent domains) oscillate at a frequency common to the EMFs trapped in it and the water molecules in the CD, and this common frequency changes when further energy is stored in the CD. The water CD effectively traps energy and exports it. When the oscillation frequency of the CD matches the oscillation frequency of some non-aqueous solute molecules present on the CD boundaries, these guest molecules become members of the CD and are able to access the entire stored energy, which becomes activation energy for the guest molecules to engage in chemical reactions.

Bioresonance

We know that biochemical reactions in the body involve resonance. This quote, from Mae-Wan Ho, confirms this:

There is independent evidence that molecules taking part in a biochemical reaction do share a common frequency, which is how they attract each other, essentially by resonating to the same frequency.

The base principle of bioresonance therapy is to “vibrate” the cellular water structure back to health by introducing a healing resonance which the tissue can be brought to match. The aim is to create a “resonance”, or “reverberation” with energy patterns to either cancel the discordant “notes” or to cause an entrainment to the system using pure, coherent “notes” to correct the patterns in the meridian system.

The correct wave pattern stimulates normal health function (Homoeostasis). These wave patterns can be obstructed or interfered with by resonance of similar wavelengths produced by toxins, viruses, bacteria, electro-magnetic pollution and allergens.

The physicist Dr Zhang concludes:

The mechanism of homeopathy can be understood in terms of the resonance effect in the electromagnetic body.

Bioresonance represents the marriage of acupuncture and homeopathy by means of the concept of resonance. Acupuncture provides an existing basic understanding of energy flows within the body. Homeopathy and similar (such as isopathy) provides a robust and extensive set of therapeutic electromagnetic signatures and combinations to bring the energy flows into balance.

Both of these fields have benefited from the discoveries and use of bioresonance therapy. Acupuncture has benefited from the discovery of additional meridians and points which were identified by Dr. Voll using electrodermal testing. Homeopathy has benefited by the demand for nosodes, organ preparations, combination remedies, and other specific remedies, and by the companies who rose to the challenge to providing these remedies. In addition, because many thousands of these remedies and combinations have been digitised, they cannot be lost to posterity if a supplier ceases to manufacture them for any reason.

Bioresonance therapy uses coherent energy signatures including homeopathic remedies, tested on the patient and chosen based on their resonant effect on one or more acupuncture points, with the aim of improving the energy flow within the electromagnetic body.

Quoting Zhang:

Electromagnetic waves travel more than a million times faster than the movement of molecules and nervous system pulses. In fact, they travel so fast that they can cross the body numerous times and share all information through all parts of the body. For this reason, no event in the electromagnetic body can be isolated from the rest of the body, and the information from every event can be found in the whole body — it is completely holistic.

When understood in this way, we recognise that energy medicine, particularly bioresonance therapy, represents the future of medicine. Our medical endeavours must move from a purely reductionist basis into the coordination and wholeness which are present in the body.

Classical and non-classical bioresonance therapy

There are two main types of bioresonance therapy: classical bioresonance, and non-classical.

Non-classical bioresonance therapy includes all of the devices that have been developed after and apart from the MORA technology. These devices can be used for electrodermal testing of the acupuncture point and meridian energy, and to discover vibrational medicines which resonate and therefore have a therapeutic effect on the body’s energy environment. They also act as frequency generators, sometimes using test sets of digitised electromagnetic signatures of therapeutic substances and predefined sequences of frequencies, pulsed or non-pulsed, which are called programs.

Classical bioresonance therapy (MORA technology, invented by Dr. Fritz Morell and electrical engineer Eric Rasche) distinguishes itself from the other types of bioresonance devices and therapy because in addition to everything that the other devices do, it is also able to “read” the energy meridians, and increase the flow of the body’s own healthy oscillations, while inverting (so as to cancel out) the flow of unhealthy energies. This therapy adds electrons to the body, by taking the body’s own energetic vibrational patterns, amplifying them and returning them to the body where they are available for healing.

Whether we are talking about classical bioresonance therapy or the more common bioresonance, the therapies are painless, non-invasive, and effective. And of course, holistic.

Because of the testing which takes place before the therapy, bioresonance treatment is specific to each individual and up to date based on the immediate energy situation.

Clinical studies

Bioresonance therapy balances and enhances the energy flow within the meridians so that the patient can easily return to full health. For this reason it is useful for a wide variety of illnesses.

There have been over 70 positive clinical human studies on bioresonance therapy, covering areas as diverse as allergic diseases, smoking cessation, functional diseases of the gastro-intestinal system, rheumatic diseases, obstructive airway disease (OAD), hepatic disease, pains, infectious disease, and amalgam elimination. There were two clinical studies with partial negative results on allergic disease. No adverse effects were found in any of the studies, whose participants totalled 11,941 people.

Two peer-reviewed studies are of particular importance:

  • Herrmann and Galle 2011 (EJIM): Experimental study with 935 participants, chronic therapy resistant patients with allergies, infections and pains (internal-orthopaedic-neurologic), success rate: 80-90% (this is evidence of practical effectiveness)
  • Pihtili, Galle, Cuhadaroglu, et al. 2014 (FKM, peer-reviewed): Randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind study with 190 participants, smoking cessation, same effect as the best medicines however without their partially significant adverse effects (this is evidence of specific effectiveness)

Case study

Using bioresonance therapy in my naturopathic practice is a fulfilling way to practice medicine. The results are quick and lasting. The following is a description of one of the new clients I saw this year. It is a typical case, and not very complicated.

Initial consultation 12 May 2018

The client is a 36-year-old woman with 2 children. She has not been well since her second child was born, in March of 2017. During the birth, she experienced pelvic trauma (pelvic floor and nerve damage). Before her current ill health, she was in full-time practice as a medical doctor.

Symptoms

  • Extreme fatigue – unable to work. Must lay in bed nearly all day. Was forced to move in with her parents so that they can take care of her and her children. Her husband works long hours.
  • Insomnia – it takes 2-3 hours for her to fall asleep at night. She reported that between February and March of this year, she did not sleep at all.
  • Aches and pains in many joints, which started with the insomnia.
  • Constant high levels of anxiety. Had a panic attack 5 months ago (January) and feels on the verge of panic frequently – is worried that she is dying.
  • Diarrhea for 6 months when breastfeeding her second child. Occasional abdominal pain and constipation now, which she attributes to the pelvic trauma during the second child’s birth (pelvic floor and nerve damage). Diagnosis of pre-renal failure during that time.
  • Swollen painful gums and one particularly bad mouth ulcer which started after minor trauma to the gum.
  • Itchy red spots on her face for the past 2 years.
  • Dry eyes and mouth since the panic attack 5 months ago.
  • Constant hunger and weight loss, which is distressing as she is already quite slim. Two parasites were identified in a stool test – Blastocystis and Dientamoeba. This happened after she was swimming in the ocean and suddenly realised that raw sewage was being dumped into the vicinity of where she was swimming. Horrified, she got out of the water as quickly as possible and washed thoroughly.
  • Brain fog.
  • Bruxism for as long as she can remember.

History

2006 supraumbilical hernia repair

2008 colposcopy with PAP smear

2012 ruptured ectopic pregnancy and removal of Fallopian tube.

carcinoid tumour on appendix

2013 colonoscopy and parasites found

2016 needle stick injury which caused Hepatitis B

2016 Herpes simplex virus

2017 second child born, resulting in pelvic floor and nerve damage, leading to prolapse

In addition to these procedures, she has had eczema, Epstein-Barr virus, influenza and hypertension in the past.

Findings

Toxicity measured at 960 scale units (normal is 30 or below, however it is rare for a new client to come in with low toxicity).

Pathogens: Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Ghiardia, Salmonella, Herpes zoster, Coxsackie viral strains, Grippe strains, 7 species of parasites, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus haemolyticus.

Toxic metals: Cadmium, Arsenic, Beryllium, Aluminium, Lead

Nutrients deficient or blocked: Folic acid, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Manganese, Chromium,

Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, D, E, K

Imbalances in gut bacteria including Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidus.

Stomach pH: 5.5

Blood spin: Resonance with radioactivity

Food intolerances: Cow’s milk products and wheat (nothing further tested at this point)

Discussion

With a new client I like to proceed cautiously, and although she was debilitated due to lack of sleep, parasites, and diarrhea, I could see that there was plenty of vitality to work with. Therefore, I chose to target the Cadmium and pathogens, and to prescribe an herbal antiparasitic combination which has always given good results in the past. If she had been severely debilitated or showing any kidney symptoms, I would not have targeted Cadmium at this consultation, since it can be hard for the kidneys to remove.

First the blood spin was corrected. This is a short treatment using a drop of blood on a piece of filter paper, placed into a vortex-shaped device called the spin tester. The treatment involves sending the inverted pattern of the blood spin into the client for a little more than 2 minutes. Retesting showed that it was effective.

The supportive treatment was next. Its purpose is to balance the energies in the meridian system while stimulating lymph drainage, liver and kidney function. It included homeopathic remedies which are particularly suitable to assist lymph, liver and kidney function (“drainage” remedies), as well as remedies to aid in healing the GIT, mucous membranes of the mouth, and immune system, plus the vibrational patterns of the nutrients which resonated. Only the remedies and vibrational patterns that resonate are ever used.

The last treatment in this session targeted toxins and pathogens, so I call it the “loosening” treatment. The most toxic heavy metal that resonated with her was Cadmium, therefore this is where I started. I also selected the nosodes that resonated.

I then made two remedy bottles for her to take, using the test sets on my bioresonance device:

  • Sleep drops consisting of homeopathic Ignatia 200K (eases worries). Dosage: a few drops under the tongue nightly at least once, but every time she wakes, take again.
  • Support drops consisting of Nux vomica 200K (for digestion), Gelsemium 30K (for energy), Lycopodium 200K (for liver, gallbladder and pancreas), Echinacea compositum (immune support). Dosage: a few drops under the tongue twice a day.

She was instructed to drink enough filtered water to cause hourly urination during the daytime for 3 days, and to take two antiparasitic herbal tablets (described in table below) daily for 30 days (or possibly longer – we would retest in approximately 30 days to see if a longer dosage time was needed, which did indeed turn out to be the case).

Initial treatment

Second consultation 23 May 2018

When she returned for her first follow-up consultation two weeks later, she reported that her sleep was significantly improved, but she was not able to stay asleep the entire night.

She still had watery diarrhea about three times nightly with urgency and slight abdominal pain.

The red spots on her face were disappearing.

She was still very fatigued, with emotional lability, indecision, fear and feelings of overwhelm.

She confided that she was uncertain of her future and concerned that she might never be able to work again. She felt trapped in her current living situation.

Her toxicity registered as 840 scale units, which is a nice big decrease from the previous measurement of 960. She did not report any particular detoxification (Herxheimer) symptoms. This suggested to me that her kidneys were functioning well.

I retested for resonance with parasites and the pathogens. No resonance found for parasites. Epstein-Barr virus resonated at 200K potency, as did Salmonella D4.

Discussion

The improvement in her sleep is an important sign. The fatigue will decrease further when the Epstein-Barr virus is no longer detectable.

Testing revealed that she no longer resonated with lead or aluminium although I had not explicitly treated them. I have seen this happen frequently after the initial treatment. The body seems to clear more metals than requested. When this happens, the client normally experiences strong detoxification symptoms, however, she did not notice this.

Her diarrhea was persisting at night, and testing revealed that Salmonella would need to be treated. I also gave her a live culture of kefir and instructions for how to use it. This will rapidly bring her gut flora into balance as the Salmonella leaves.

The antiparasitic herbs must be continued for at least 30 days, with no gaps. This is because any remaining eggs can hatch at any time and if the herbs are in the body at that moment, the hatchlings will immediately die before there’s any possibility of them laying their own eggs and restarting the cycle.

Her body has been in sympathetic dominance for a long time and anxiety had become the new normal. Further support must be done. I created some “calm” drops (see below).

Treatments

Series of treatments and results

To date, she has come for several more consultation-treatments, during which time her toxicity levels decreased to less than 30, Epstein-Barr and other nosodes stopped resonating, and her energy gradually improved. As soon as the toxic metals were gone, her nutrients were no longer showing deficient/blocked. Here is her progress over the next 3 months:

Current situation

She is now looking forward to returning to full-time work, and is planning her future with enthusiasm. She is reintroducing the foods to which she had been intolerant and is preparing to return to her normal life.

References

  1. Paraphrased from Zhang, Changlin, Invisible Rainbow – A physicist’s introduction to the science behind classical Chinese medicine, North Atlantic Books, Berkeley California, 2016.
  2. Zhang, ibid, p 47.
  3. Zhang, ibid, pp 64-64, shown with a photograph.
  4. Zhang, ibid, p 114.
  5. Rein & McCraty 1993; as quoted in Oschman, Energy Medicine: The Scientific Basis, 1st edition, Elsevier Limited, © 2000, page 239.
  6. Ho, Mae-Wan, Living Rainbow H2O, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., Singapore © 2012, p. 75.
  7. Ho, ibid, p 77.
  8. Ho, ibid, p 78.
  9. Ho, ibid, page 59.
  10. Zhang, op cit, p 114.
  11. Taken from CD that accompanies “Electroacupuncture – A practical manual and resource, by David F Mayor (ed), Elsevier 2007. “The second of Voll’s contributions was to locate many points not on the traditional charts. Some of these are on meridians, and some he proposed as points on new meridians (“vessels”). These meridians differed from the traditional ones, in that they did not correspond to simple organs or functions. Apart from the 24-point Lymph vessel, most have points only on the hands or feet. Voll considered them generally in terms of organic ‘degeneration’, and named them accordingly… For the most part, they have been accepted unquestioningly by his successors. He also created a useful new category of points: the Control measurement points (CMP), located distally on the meridians. He believed that measurements here give an overview of the state of the meridians (in terms of ‘-itis’ or ‘-osis’), although not excluding abnormal readings at other specific meridian points.” [reference for this: Voll R Twenty years of electroacupuncture diagnosis in Germany: a progress report. American Journal of Acupuncture. 1973 March; 3(1): 7-17.
  12. Zhang, op cit, p 112.
  13. Available from Med-Tronik GmbH and BioKat Systeme GmbH.
  14. This information is from the BioKat Systeme GmbH Basic Course materials.
  15. BioKat MV.

Marguerite Lane, ND is the founder, owner, and operator of Chiron Health Care, which has operated in Sydney, Australia for over 18 years. She is a naturopath whose main modality is Bioresonance using the BioKat MV Bioresonance device, which is the fifth generation of MORA technology.

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